• English 6 

     

    Teachers, click here to access your working copy of the curriculum.

     

    English 6 is comprised of two classes taken concurrently: Literature and Strategies and Writing Composition

     

    Unit 1: Informational Skills

    Priority Standards

    RL.RI.6.1: Cite textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. 

    RI.6.2: Determine a central idea of a text and how it is conveyed through particular details; provide a summary of the text distinct from personal opinions or judgments 

    RI.6.6: Determine an author's point of view or purpose in a text and explain how it is conveyed in the text. 

    W.6.2: Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas, concepts, and information through the selection, organization, and analysis of relevant content. 

    1. Introduce a topic clearly, previewing what is to follow; organize ideas, concepts, and information, using strategies such as definition, classification, comparison/contrast, and cause/effect; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., charts, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension. 
    2. Develop the topic with relevant facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples. 
    3. Use appropriate transitions to create cohesion and clarify the relationships among ideas and concepts. 
    4. Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to inform about or explain the topic. 
    5. Establish and maintain a formal style. 
    6. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the information or explanation presented. 

    L.6.1-L.6.2: Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar, usage, capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing:  

    1. Ensure that pronouns are in the proper case (subjective, objective, possessive).  
    2. Use intensive pronouns (e.g., myself, ourselves).  
    3. Recognize and correct inappropriate shifts in pronoun number and person.  
    4. Recognize and correct vague pronouns (i.e., ones with unclear or ambiguous antecedents).  
    5. Recognize variations from standard English in their own and others’ writing and speaking and identify and use strategies to improve expression in conventional language.

     

    Unit 2: Argument Skills

    Priority Standards

    RL.RI.6.1: Cite textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. 

    W.6.1:Write arguments to support claims with clear reasons and relevant evidence.   

    1. Introduce claim(s) and organize the reasons and evidence clearly.  
    2. Support claim(s) with clear reasons and relevant evidence, using credible sources and demonstrating an understanding of the topic or text.  
    3. Use words, phrases, and clauses to clarify the relationships among claim(s) and reasons.  
    4. Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to support the argument.  
    5. Establish and maintain a formal style.  
    6. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from the argument presented. 

    W.6.8: Gather relevant information from multiple print and digital sources; assess the credibility of each source; and quote or paraphrase the data and conclusions of others while avoiding plagiarism and providing basic bibliographic information for sources. 

    L.6.4: Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grade 6 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies: 

    1. Use context (e.g., the overall meaning of a sentence or paragraph; a word’s position or function in a sentence) as a clue to the meaning of a word or phrase. 
    2. Use common, grade-appropriate Greek or Latin affixes and roots as clues to the meaning of a word (e.g., audience, auditory, audible). 

     SL.6.4: Present claims and findings, sequencing ideas logically and using pertinent descriptions, facts, and details to accentuate main ideas or themes; use appropriate eye contact, adequate volume, and clear pronunciation. 

     

    Unit 3: Narrative Skills

    Priority Standards

    RL.RI.6.2:Determine a theme or central idea of a text and how it is conveyed through particular details; provide a summary of the text distinct from personal opinions or judgments. (RI) Determine a central idea of a text and how it is conveyed through particular details; provide a summary of the text distinct from personal opinions or judgments. 

    RL.6.3Describe how a particular story's or drama's plot unfolds in a series of episodes as well as how the characters respond or change as the plot moves toward a resolution. 

    RL.6.4Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of a specific word choice on meaning and tone. 

    RL.6.6: Explain how an author develops the point of view of the narrator or speaker in a text. 

    W.6.3:Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, relevant descriptive details, and well-structured event sequences. 

    1. Engage and orient the reader by establishing a context and introducing a narrator and/or characters; organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally and logically. 
    2. Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, and description, to develop experiences, events, and/or characters. 
    3. Use a variety of transition words, phrases, and clauses to convey sequence and signal shifts from one time-frame or setting to another. 
    4. Use precise words and phrases, relevant descriptive details, and sensory language to convey experiences and events. 
    5. Provide a conclusion that follows from the narrated experiences or events. 

    L.6.4: Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grade 6 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies: 

    1. Use context (e.g., the overall meaning of a sentence or paragraph; a word’s position or function in a sentence) as a clue to the meaning of a word or phrase. 
    2. Use common, grade-appropriate Greek or Latin affixes and roots as clues to the meaning of a word (e.g., audience, auditory, audible). 

     

    Unit 4: Synthesis

    Priority Standards

    RL.RI.6.2: Determine a theme or central idea of a text and how it is conveyed through particular details; provide a summary of the text distinct from personal opinions or judgments. (RI) Determine a central idea of a text and how it is conveyed through particular details; provide a summary of the text distinct from personal opinions or judgments. 

    RL.6.10: By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, in the grades 6–8 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range. 

     RI.6.10: By the end of the year, read and comprehend literary nonfiction in the grades 6–8 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range. 

    W.6.8: Gather relevant information from multiple print and digital sources; assess the credibility of each source; and quote or paraphrase the data and conclusions of others while avoiding plagiarism and providing basic bibliographic information for sources. 

    W.6.10: Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences. 

cover of myPerespectives grade six textbook includes the title and a graphic of a dandelion losing seeds in the wind


  • Approved Resources

    District-Adopted Textbook

    MyPerpsectives (anthology and online resources)

     

    District-Approved Novels (titles will vary by building) 

    Dragon's Milk by Susan Fletcher

    Dragonwings by Lawrence Yep

    East by Edith Pattou

    The Egypt Game by Zipha Kealty Snyder

    Esperanza Rising by Pam Munoz Ryan

    The Iceberg Hermit by Arthur J. Roth

    The Jungle Book by Ruyard Kipling

    The Lightening Thief by Rick Riordan

    Maniac Magee by Jerry Spinelli

    Mrs. Frisby and the Rats of Nimh by Robert O'Brien

    Out of My Mind by Sharon Draper

    Pankration The Ultimate Game by Dylan Blacklock

    Peak by Roland Smith

    Quiet Power: The Secret Strength on Introverted Kids by Susan Cain

    The Red Pony by John Steinbeck

    Restart by Gordon Korman

    Savvy by Ingrid Law

    The Secret Garden by Francis Hodgson Burnett

    Seedfolk by Paul Fleischman

    Some Kind of Courage by Dan Gemeinhart

    Touching Spirit Bear by Ben Mikaealsen

    Tracker by Gary Paulssen

    Treasure Island  by Robert Lewis Stevenson

    True Confessions of Charlotte Doyle by Avi

    Tuck Everlasting by Natalie Babbit

    War Horse by Michael Morporo

    A Wrinkle in Time by Madeleine L'Engle